headerimage
Home | Contact Us

William Morris
1834 - 1896

Windows:

David
Isaiah
Boaz and Ruth
St John the Baptist Preaching
Mary Magdalene
Mary of Bethany

Philip Webb

Philip Webb
1831 - 1915

Windows:

In the Lady Chapel:
Isaiah (Tracery)
John (Tracery)
Martyrs' Window (Tracery)

Webb also painted the Canopy of Honour above the altar.

 

 

St. John the Baptist Preaching by William Morris - Lady Chapel

This window was originally at the east end of the north aisle, but was moved to its present position when the Lady Chapel was built in 1902.

Because it was so large, a gabled dormer roof had to be constructed to accomodate its height (this can be best viewed from outside).

The three lights of the window show designs by Morris of St. John the Baptist preaching penitence; Morris used Rossetti as a model for John.

Burne-Jones’s Account Book of the 27th November 1862 throws interesting light on Morris’s difficulty in drawing figures:
“Alterations to St. John Baptist designs 5s (shillings or 25p today). Altering a figure for poor Topsy (Morris’s nickname) - this I won’t charge for - I’ll give it to poor Topsy. N.B. To threaten to charge this if the firm behaves meanly in any case."

The tracery glass is by Philip Webb and relates to John the Baptist's warning that the coming judgement is very close, being based on Luke 3: 9 - "The axe is already at the root of the trees, and every tree that does not produce good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire." The axe can clearly be seen in the bottom tracery light.

Note also the two very catholic symbols in the lozenges at the top of the left and right lights: the Pelican-in-her-Piety (left) and Agnus Dei (right, which unfortunately is very much faded).

Click on any of these windows below for greater detail:

St. John the Baptist preaching by Morris St John the Baptist preaching left light John the Baptist Preaching by William Morris St John The Baptist  by William Morris Tracery by Philip Webb The Pelican-in-her-Piety Agnus Dei Lozenge

The window was the gift of Mrs John Hesp, whose late husband had been a member of the committee to promote the construction of St. Martin's, and had been mayor of Scarborough. A memorial to the Hesps can be seen in St. Mary's Church in the old town.